Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

[stock_market_widget type="ticker-quotes" template="chart" color="#5679FF" assets="MSFT,AAPL,NFLX,GOOG,TSLA,NFLX,AMZN" animation="true" display_currency_symbol="true" api="yf" speed="50" direction="left" pause="true"]

Mining

Flexible copper sensor can detect  heavy metals in sweat

“High levels of cadmium can lead to fatal problems in the airways, liver and kidneys. Lead poisoning damages the central nervous system and causes irritability, cognitive impairment, fatigue, infertility, high blood pressure in adults and delayed growth and development in children,” Paulo Augusto Raymundo Pereira, last author of the article, said in a media statement.

flexible-copper-sensor-can-detect -heavy-metals-in-sweat

High levels of cadmium can lead to fatal problems in the airways, liver and kidneys. Lead poisoning damages the central nervous system and causes irritability, cognitive impairment, fatigue, infertility, high blood pressure in adults and delayed growth and development in children,” Paulo Augusto Raymundo Pereira, last author of the article, said in a media statement.

According to Raymundo Pereira, humans eliminate heavy metals mainly in sweat and urine, and analyses of these biofluids are a vital part of toxicological tests as well as treatment.

So far, devices to detect heavy metals in biofluids have been made with expensive materials. The new solution, on the other hand, has been produced using polyethylene terephthalate [PET], on top of which there is a conductive flexible copper adhesive tape, a label of the kind that can be bought from a stationer’s with the sensor printed on it, and a protective layer of nail polish or spray.

“The exposed copper is removed by immersion in ferric chloride solution for 20 minutes, followed by washing in distilled water to promote the necessary corrosion,” study co-author Robson R. da Silva said. “All of this ensures speed, scalability, low power and low cost.”

The device is connected to a potentiostat, a portable instrument that determines the concentration of each metal by measuring differences in potential and current between electrodes. The results are displayed on a computer or smartphone using appropriate software.

In the researchers’ view, the system is simple enough to be used by non-specialists without training, as well as by technicians in hospitals, clinics and doctor’s offices. 

The device can also be used in several types of environmental management situations, such as artesian wells that are regulated and require constant monitoring to analyze water quality.

The sensor’s performance in detecting lead and cadmium was assessed in trials using artificial sweat enriched under ideal experimental conditions. Adaptations are required before the device can be patented.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Stocks

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — Among the companies whose shares are expected to see active trade in Thursday’s session are BlackBerry Ltd., Oracle Corp., and...

Mining

NAL spodumene concentrate production remains targeted for H1 2023 with revenue potential in Q3 2023. Credit: Piedmont Piedmont Lithium (Nasdaq: PLL; ASX: PLL) announced...

Top Stories

There have been major developments out of Japan this week. The Bank of Japan surprised the market by widening its yield curve target by...

Crypto

Cardano founder Charles Hoskinson has shared his thoughts on ADA not being listed on the Gemini crypto exchange. Where such an exchange not listing...